Want to stay updated on my blog posts? Subscribe by Email today!

Like I am a Diabetic Warrior on Facebook

Friday, March 28, 2014

Life for a Child Program

No comments:


"Diabetes is a great challenge in the developing world. Many children and adolescents with diabetes die quickly or are chronically unwell due to lack of availability of quality care. The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) Life for a Child Programme currently supports diabetes clinics/hospitals caring for children and adolescents in 43 countries.

The IDF Diabetes Atlas (Sixth Edition, 2013) estimates that there are over 497,000 children under 15 years with type 1 diabetes. There is probably a similar number of youth with diabetes aged 15-25.

However, the estimates for numbers of children and youth in many developing countries are very incertain due to lack of data. Additionally type 2 diabetes is on the increase in children and adolescents in all countries irrespective of socio-economic status. It is estimated that 80-100,000 children and youth around the world are in urgent need of assistance.

Lack of access to insulin remains the most common cause of death in a child with diabetes (Gale, 2006). The estimated life expectancy of a child who has just developed diabetes could be less than a year in some areas (Beran et al, 2005). Many die undiagnosed, others through lack of insulin or lack of expert care. In some countries, expert care is available but resources are limited and so early and serious complications frequently lead to death in young adulthood."

By donating just $1 a day to the IDF Life for a Child (LFAC) Programme, you can provide a child with:

  • Regular insulin
  • Quality blood glucose monitoring equipment (meter, strips, lancets)
  • Essential clinical care
  • Up-to-date diabetes education materials
  • Specialised diabetes training for medical staff 

The Programme aims to provide:
  • Sufficient insulin and syringes
  • Blood glucose monitoring equipment
  • Appropriate clinical care
  • HbA1c testing
  • Diabetes education
  • Technical support for health professionals


Please go to: http://www.idf.org/lifeforachild/donate

Thank Your Representative for Helping to Renew the Special Diabetes Program

No comments:
JDRF emailed me to let me know that the U.S. House of Representatives approved a one-year extension of the Special Diabetes Program (SDP), at the current funding level of $150 million, as part of the 'Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014' (H.R. 4302).  The U.S. Senate is now expected to consider the legislation by Monday, March 31st.

You can read about the news here: http://www2.jdrf.org/site/MessageViewer?dlv_id=38778&em_id=22090.0

This is great news and thank you to all of you who sent messages to your representatives and please send them a thank you via the link on the website.

At a loss for words

No comments:
I try to put a positive spin on comments from people about Diabetes.  Sometimes I am just not sure what to say. The one I hear over and over and over again from people goes something like this:  Me: I am sorry I have to eat something my blood sugar is dropping and I am a type 1 Diabetic so I cannot really wait it out.  Then whoever the person is I am telling this to just so happens to say, oh my (insert relative) died from Diabetes, they had it really bad or they lost their foot/leg/toe.

Insert really flabbergasted face from me. 

I know I am kind of setting myself up for comments like this when I have to tell someone why I am being rude and eating in front of them but it doesnt mean its ok for people to say such things and I feel I should tell them why I am shoving food in my face like its the last piece of food with sugar in it in the world.
 
I don't understand the need for people to say these things so a person living with Type 1 Diabetes.  I swear Diabetes is the only condition that people feel its ok to say, well my grandma/grandpa/uncle/aunt died from Diabetes.  I usually just brush it off but sometimes, man, its like they slapped you in the face and said oh good luck with that I hope it doesn't kill you too.   They might as well say exactly that.

Normally I say something to the affect of well treatments are a lot better today and we can check our blood sugar unlike 30-40 years ago no one checked their blood sugar at home.  We also have better insulin and I am on an insulin pump and glucose sensor which makes management much better than in your relatives time. I try to keep it simple because usually they really dont care to hear what I have to say about it or they get this really confused look on their face.  Getting all technical with a non Diabetic person is usually a waste of breath.

I dont know, I guess I am just a little bit tired of hearing people say that.  It hurts even if it doesn't appear to.  Or I guess it hurts me, I cant say how any other Diabetic feels when they get told this. Never in a million years would I say to someone, oh well I know so and so died from that, if they have that same condition.  Good Lord people can you share a little bit more of a positive response.  Maybe something along the lines of oh, I hear that treatments are a lot better now and there is a lot of new technology available.  That would be a much kinder thing to say.


Thursday, March 27, 2014

Bennet Dunlap Diabetes Advocate interviews the FDA and you can participate!

No comments:
This is great opportunity for anyone with Diabetes who checks their blood sugar.  Learn what the FDA is doing to make our test strips more accurate.  This is an important manner for all of us considering how little regulation there currently is to make sure the ONE thing we base our Diabetes management off of can be so inaccurate and cause serious consequences.


"From FDA:
Please join us for a Patient Network Live Chat! Diabetes: Glucose Monitors and Test Strips

Talk with FDA expert Courtney Lias and Patient Advocate Bennet Dunlap about Glucose Monitors and Test Strips Monday, March 31, 1:30–2:30 pm (EDT)

Talk, share, and connect with the

FDA and the Diabetes Patient Community"
Go to this link to read more about this unique opportunity and to see where to go to join in on the chat!   http://www.ydmv.net/2014/03/tune-in-as-doc-to-interviews-fda-live.html

Why is it so hard for Endo's to download the t:slim pump's software t:connect?

No comments:
I keep hearing this over and over, my Endo's office could not upload my t:slim because they didn't have the software.

Huh? Say that again?

That is crazy, its available ONLINE for anyone to download.  Seriously.

I am pretty sure I downloaded the software onto my CDE's computer for her and it was no big deal.  Why are doctors offices having such a big cow over this?  WE, the people trying to manage our Diabetes are paying YOU, the Doctor to help us.  Why do you they feel its ok to complain or whine about it at all?  Sorry, no sympathy from me.  I mean seriously, I am pretty sure my insurance gets charged over $200 bucks a pop to see my Endo, and my Endo is freaking great so I dont complain about the costs.  It still isnt exactly easy to pay when you are paying a lot of money per month just to stay alive.

Last year I had my first child and managed my Diabetes.  I paid $19,000 in medical costs last year.  Yes you read that correctly $19,000 and was off work for two months.  I made no money last year.

Complaining about downloading free software is unacceptable.

Go here to download it, FREE:
https://tconnect.tandemdiabetes.com/GettingStarted/

Here is the list of meters you can download to the software:
http://www.tandemdiabetes.com/Products/Glucose-Monitoring/

Tuesday, March 25, 2014

5 Ways Diabetes Wreaks Havoc On Your Entire Life

No comments:

http://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-13061/5-ways-diabetes-wreaks-havoc-on-your-entire-life.html


A very good article by Ginger explaining some of the ways Diabetes changes your life and the way we have to navigate around it. 

She talks about how:

1. Diabetes is nonstop, 24/7.
2. The pressure to be perfect is impossible to endure.
3. We are constantly being graded. 
4. Diabetes can be very scary.
5. You're constantly defending yourself.

Check out the article at the link above. 


Frio insulin cooling case, anyone here tried one?

No comments:
I have heard many many people say that the Frio insulin cooling cases work amazingly well.  I evem read someone in a group on facebook say they went to Australia camping with one!  Has anyone here used one?  I tell people about them all the time, yet never used one because I haven't needed to as of yet.  I just keep my open bottle of insulin in my dia-junk bag in my purse.  If I was going to a really hot or cold climate I suppose would need to get one. 

Any way, in case no one you have heard of them or need something like this, here is their website! 

http://www.frioinsulincoolingcase.com/

Monday, March 24, 2014

Reblogging: Medicare’s Lackluster Diabetes Coverage… Let’s Make Some Noise!

No comments:
 You may not be anywhere near the age of needing Medicare but some day if you plan on retiring and are using CGM's now you will have to completely self fund on Medicare.  Also other insurance companies tend to follow Medicare's lead, this is not good at all.  We do not need health insurance companies to stop funding CGM's.  I personally cannot go without my CGM and there is also NO way I can self fund them either.  I need my insurance company to keep coverage for CGM technology.  Please sign the petitions and contact your legislators.  Let them know we need coverage for CGM's and we need Medicare to cover them.  As it stands now, there is no way I will ever go on Medicare.  I will not give up my Dexcom. 

http://www.diabetesmine.com/2014/03/medicares-lackluster-diabetes-coverage-lets-make-some-noise.html

Reblogging: A window of opportunity is closing.

1 comment:
I am reblogging on a very important matter.  Everyone needs to act on this! I added my comments, will you please do the same.  It takes 2 minutes!  There are now 177 comments.  PLEASE add yours for me, my brothers, my uncles, my aunt, my cousins, my friends, your family members, your loved ones.  WE all need this support!

http://happy-medium.net/2014/03/21/a-window-of-opportunity-is-closing/

Your category would be individual consumer, a few people were confused on what to choose.   Or at least that is what I chose.

03/27/2014: There are only 201 comments on there now.  How many Diabetic's are in this country and there are only 201 comments!!  PLEASE leave your comments, we NEED this! 

APRIL 7th is the DEADLINE TO COMMENT!!

"FDA has proposed new meter accuracy guidance.  They are open to our views and have two dockets to take comments on the draft guidance, before they become final rules. These dockets are a unique opportunity where the FDA is focused on listening – we need them to hear us. The current rules for glucose meters date back to 2003. If that is indicative of the frequency of rule making, it may be another decade before we get another chance to help shape the future of meter accuracy.
Let’s make this count. We only have until April 7th.
The number of comments matters. The more FDA gets, the more the diabetes community will be heard. Other interests will lobby for their views. We must speak up for our health. Our lives." http://www.stripsafely.com/sample-page/guidance/


Wednesday, March 19, 2014

My blog list isnt working

No comments:
So the list of blogs I follow is not working on my page today.  I dont know how to fix it either, no matter what I do they wont show up.  Please bear with me, hopefully later today I can get it to work. 

Tuesday, March 18, 2014

Do you ever wonder?

No comments:
Do you ever wonder if some day you wont have to take insulin from a bottle?

Do you ever wonder if people will stop making rude comments about your Diabetes? Oh you have the bad kind of Diabetes? No type of Diabetes is good last time I checked, why is it ok for people to say that to me? If someone has Cancer, do you say oh you have the bad kind, like any Cancer is ever good? I'm so exhausted from the hurtful comments from people. I have a tough hide on me but after the 20th time in one week, inside I really just want to break down and cry and say yes, I have type one Diabetes and no I don't need you to point out to me that it isnt a good thing to have. No Disease is a good thing to have, I didn't sign up to have Diabetes.

Do you ever wonder if you will ever go without a healing insulin pump infusion set hole on your skin, or be without bruises from injections?

Do you ever wonder if someday you can tell someone who was born after they cure diabetes that you use to have diabetes?

Tonight as I was trying to change my insulin pump I was looking at my scarred hips and near crying because I'm so afraid someday I wont be able to find a place to put my infusion set. It took me five painful times of stabbing the side of my butt to find a place that didnt hurt like heck because I hit a blood vessel or vein. I go as shallow as I can with my comfort short sets but not too shallow because then the insulin burns me. Im so sick of insulin burning me as it goes in, it always has and it always will. Sometimes I dont want to eat a large amt of carbs because I know the bolus will burn like hell.
I dont want to even have the worry that someday my tissue will be so scarred up that no where will work for an insulin pump. I cant use my legs, arms or stomach for my pump without being in incredible pain by 12 hours or less. I know I shouldn't worry about things I cannot control but anyone with a chronic disease worries about what lies ahead. I dont worry nonstop but I have my moments.
I just want to be done with the constant management of my Diabetes that no one else understands or cares to understand.
Im so tired of managing my Diabetes.  Some days more than other I just want to give up, but I know I cant. I have an Uncle who has been type one for over 35 years, I believe, and I cant imagine the ride he has taken. 35 years ago no one even checked their blood sugar, the tools were not there. My grandpa died in his 50s from Diabetes and smoking. He died in his 50s, can you imagine that? I miss him horribly and wish I could go back in time give him my humalog, my pump, my dexcom, my glucometer and a million test strips.

I guess when you have something like Diabetes you find out who your true friends are and what family members truly care. I'm on Dexcoms freaking website for God sake and only maybe THREE people in my real life congratulated me. THREE?! Really? Man I thought that was a huge accomplishment, out of how many other people with type one Diabetes are out there, they asked me? They picked me? I try my hardest to help other people with Diabetes and I know they appreciate it but what about my friends and family? Not even a congrats. Im so hurt. Why do people with any other condition get so much more support it seems, what is it about Diabetes? I guess my blinders are on and I dont see it.

I try to stay positive and upbeat about having type one but its just exhausting at times. My mind is never at ease, it can never take a break from counting carbs, worrying about what I ate will do to my blood sugar or wondering if I took too much insulin and will go low later on. Then the guilt I feel if I go too high after eating something, my mind wonders what damage right now is being done to my body because my will power gave up and I ate that carb loaded food. When anyone else with a working pancreas doesn't bat an eye but then they look at you with disgust because you are eating it and you "shouldn't" be. They too shouldn't be eating it then either, they just dont have the extreme guilt I feel because my Dexcom starts screaming at me and because I know my blood sugar is rising. Dexcom guilt is a huge deterrent for me sometimes.

Im trying my best and working hard to manage a disease that no one wants or wants to hear or talk about. Im trying my best to help other people with Diabetes by doing whatever I can to help them get back on track or find a good doctor. I don't want Diabetes, I don't want to take shots, I dont want to count carbs but that is my life. There is no other choice and if you (non diabetics) were faced with the situation you would do the same thing.

I guess there really is no point in this blog just that I know how alone Diabetes can make a person feel. Before the facebook support groups I joined I had no idea that I was not the only person who felt this way sometimes. You whoever you are, are not alone. Diabetes is nonstop management and it wears you out but don't give up, keep working at it and if you aren't getting the support you need find a new endo or cde, join a support group but dont sit alone crying at your kitchen table because you think you are the only one who feels the way you do.  Don't give up and don't half attempt to mange your Diabetes. You cannot ignore it in hopes it will go away. That kind of thinking will put you on a fast track to a whole lot of medical issues. You can do it. You can manage your Diabetes, it just takes a lot of work and support.  Without support it seems to be a much harder task and it is easy to get off track.  I am not perfect by any means and right now I am feeling a bit of Diabetes burnout but talking about it on support groups and helping other people helps me to stay on track.  Helping others helps me to keep the fire burning and my motivation going.  

What do you wonder?  Leave me some comments about your thoughts and I will post them. 

Monday, March 17, 2014

Asante joins up with Tidepool

No comments:

Astante snap pump partnering with Tidepool!
http://www.diabetesmine.com/2014/01/asante-partners-with-tidepool-on-open-source-diabetes-data-platform.html

So Asante Snap Pump has joined the Tidepool open source information effort, who will join next? Dexcom? Tandem Diabetes Care? Medtronic? Bayer? Freestyle? One Touch?

We need this now, not in 2-4 years! All our data in one place, overlay all the information together, it would make our management of our Diabetes so much easier!

Please hurry.

That moment your Dexcom alarms

No comments:

It is that moment your Dexcom alarms.  Do you get up right away and test to confirm or just kind of not feel like getting up right away and waiting a few minutes?

I seem to do this more frequently lately. What is my deal? I will just ignore the alarm or silence it. Until I really start to feel like crap. Right now Dexter says 100 but I feel lower. I suppose I should get up and check my b.g.

I just dont want to reach over to my meter. I dont feel like eating any extra calories. This looooooong cold snowy Winter has killed my will power. When I say killed I mean, like beat it up, knocked it out and threw it in the trash. I think I have gained 10 pounds in like two weeks. Yeah thats bad. Im normally very good at managing my weight/diabetes/low blood sugar extra calories. My scale has a dead battery and Im horrified to replace it. I have to lose this weight by my endo appt. I do not want to see that number scream in my face.

Of course it is the Easter candies fault though you know. Who can resist Easter candy? Ahhh I hate the temptation! Im losing the war against Easter candy.

Anyways I suppose that doesnt have anything to do with my laziness to pay attention to my Dexcom. Maybe information overload burnout is getting me too. 

Man I just need warm weather and no more SNOW!

Anyone ingore alarms sometimes?  I know I shouldnt but I still do. Why? What is my deal?

I am a Diabetes Advocate (officially)!

No comments:

Today, I got the news my application to be a member of the Diabetes Advocates was accepted!  I am incredibly honored to be a part of this community! I am unsure of when I will be listed on the website.

Diabetes Advocates is a program of the Diabetes Hands Foundation, a nonprofit organization that brings together people touched by diabetes for positive change so that nobody living with this condition ever feels alone.

Mission
To connect advocates dedicated to improving the lives of people living with diabetes in order to accelerate and amplify their efforts
Goals 2013-2015
1. Continue growing the reach and impact of the program, by:
  • Creating paths for diabetes advocacy for members of the diabetes online community.
  • Increasing the number of Diabetes Advocates members focused on type 2 diabetes.
  • Increasing the number of Spanish-speaking Diabetes Advocates members.
  • Increasing awareness about Diabetes Advocates, starting with an emphasis in the US.
2. Increase the measurable impact of the program through:
  • Increasing member engagement in Diabetes Advocates initiatives.
  • Expanding benefits that impact sustainability and member development.
  • Hosting an annual Diabetes Advocacy Congress.
  • Consolidate Diabetes Advocates as a hub for collaboration among diabetes advocates.
Membership Benefits
To apply for membership, complete the membership application form. Applicants are evaluated by a Membership Committee, made up of current members of the program.

Tuesday, March 11, 2014

Ok so I guess I was in the dark about Galileo Analytics and Tidepool! These companies are awesome!

No comments:
Getting on the Twitter bang wagon was the best decision I have ever made, I think, to keep up with the latest Diabetes research related news.  I learn things on there all the time, it is blowing my mind.

I am sure I am the last one to hear about Galileo Analytics: http://www.galileoanalytics.com/http://www.galileoanalytics.com/

And Tidepool: http://tidepool.org/

These companies are AMAZING!  There is a new-ish article on co-founder Anna McCollister-Slipp @annamcslipp on Forbes.  http://www.forbes.com/sites/danmunro/2014/03/09/the-view-of-digital-health-from-an-engaged-patient/

They are both working on their own versions of software to allow us Diabetics to combine the data from all of our devices into one place, one screen, one graph, it would be a little bit more than AMAZING to say the least!  Now that I know of them I am going to have to keep checking the progress! 

Monday, March 10, 2014

I think someone switched my insulin with water today.

No comments:

Seriously.  Water.  My blood sugar will not come down below 300 no matter what I do today.  This makes for a fun day when my fuse is cut in half and my head is killing me and Im pretty sure the only thing that kept me from puking today was staying busy, walking around taking pics of cars for the website.  I dont even want to know what my ketone level was today.

I am trying to concentrate on the things people are saying to me but it kind of sounds like the teacher on Charlie Brown.  Whaw whaw whaw whaw, all kind of runs together.  I am trying so hard to concentrate and it just isnt happening.  I hate that. 

I hate high blood sugar.  It makes me feel like crap.  My mouth is dry no matter how much water I drink, my head is killing me and I cannot stop yawning.  I feel like I look like a fool, I cant stop yawning.

Don't you wonder why you have days when your blood sugar just wont come down?  I thought my pump site had not gone bad because I would be at 500 by now if it had, right?  I am wondering if the absorption has decided to go to crap, I was on day two of my site. Came home and changed it. No kinks in the plastic cannula but I do have a nice big bump under my skin and it hurts. This is what I hate about pumping.

For whatever awesome reason my body decided to go all crazy attack mode on my infusion site. So now I have a nice painful lump, it will be gone in a week or so but it doesn't help me feel any better about it. These are the moments my anxiety puts the pedal to the metal and I want to bash my pump into a million pieces with a hammer. Just beat the living crap out of it because it causes me so much pain. Then to top it off my pump site change tonight was terrible. 30 minutes to put another one in. Yep. 30. Why my skin has to be tough as a cow hide is beyond me but trying to shove the awesome 15mm or so needle into my skin isn't fun. It hurts. I do still cry sometimes. I don't have any other choices though. I have to get it in and in somewhere where I don't put it in a blood vessel because then it back flows into the cannula and I can never get the blood to clear back out so I have to rip it off and start over again with a new infusion set. These are the downfalls to pumping, for me. 

Shots are not an option. I cannot manage my crazy insulin sensitivity on shots, half doses on a syringe are too much. Shots give me HUGE bruises. I took one correction shot last night on my side, huge bruise. HUGE. I don't ever bruise for any other reason but insulin injections. No idea why. Its insane. Totally insane. 

And now Dexcom is telling me I'm back up to 300. Are you freaking kidding me?!  I'm done. Stick a fork in me I'm done fighting this freaking battle today! Que the headache and nausea. 

Then I wake up this morning at......drum roll......59!  Good ole Dexter is getting replaced today. It only alarmed when I was below 90. Nada after that! Not good. 





Friday, March 7, 2014

Act NOW: Renew Federal Special Diabetes Program

No comments:
Please go here to submit your letter to congress.

Act NOW: Renew Federal Special Diabetes Program

Greetings T1D Advocates!
JDRF is getting spring fever here with our Special Diabetes Program (SDP) renewal efforts and we need your help!
The SDP, a federal program that is helping to advance type 1 diabetes research, expires this September and Congress is considering legislation RIGHT NOW that could renew the SDP for multiple years!
Stand with us! Please help by emailing your Members of Congress to let them know how much you care about the SDP and ask them to renew the SDP now.  If the program is not renewed, JDRF and other private funders will not be able to fill the gap and promising clinical trials will end.
Please personalize the letter to your Member(s) of Congress, and then remember to share this alert with friends and family and ask them to take action, too.
Go to the link to send your letter.

Thursday, March 6, 2014

My super crazy exciting news! I am on Dexcom's website!!!

1 comment:
Ok so my CRAZY EXCITING NEWS is finally live and I can now tell you all!! I am on Dexcom's Website!! 

http://dexcom.com/heroes/megan

I was approached by Dexcom a few months ago and asked if I would like to be a Dexcom "Hero" on their website.  Of course I was completely shocked and honored to be asked. 

The Dexcom has changed my life and I want to tell every single Diabetic I come across in my daily life.  I talk to a lot of people with Diabetes in my office and I try my best to try to help them out if they act like they are wanting guidance.  I try to help them see there is help and there is hope when some of them seem like they will never get back on track and no one around here is able to help.  I don't try to be their doctor or give them advice on their medical treatment plan, but I try to get them in gear to talk to the right people to help them and let them know they can get back on track.  We all fall off the Diabetes wagon at times, its relentless condition that you cant take a vacation from.

I have pointed numerous people to my Educator Calli and my Endo Dr. Iverson.  These two people have changed my life and I owe them so much that I cant even put it into words.

Calli is my life saver and gets me back on track when I need her to. She is my friend whom I trust with my life and I do not know how I made it without her help.  Countless people I talk to do not know we have such a wonderful Diabetes Educator in a nearby city.  Calli and her co-worker Teresa are such a great source of information and current technology. 

Dr. Iverson is an amazing Endo, he stays on top of the newest tech and helps get his patients on pumps and CGM's instead of being afraid of them like many Endo's still are.  He CALLS me himself and this in itself is amazing.  Doctors do not call patients anymore, period. This guys does.  He is not afraid of one brand or another nor does he push one brand over another.  Or at least in my case.

I am honored to be on the Dexcom Heroes page and I still cannot believe I was even asked!

Dexcom is my flashlight in the long dark tunnel of Type 1 Diabetes.


(As part of the agreement to be on Dexcom's website I did receive one complimentary box of sensors, I am not paid to give my opinions about Dexcom, just sharing my story and they gave me four sensors) 

Reposting: Type 1 Diabetes Finally Explained

1 comment:
This article is great.


 http://www.huffingtonpost.com/riva-greenberg/type-1-diabetes_b_4869238.html

Type 1 Diabetes Finally Explained

Wednesday, March 5, 2014

Sharing a bloggers post: What You Should Know About Flying with an Insulin Pump

No comments:
http://asweetlife.org/feature/what-you-should-know-about-flying-with-an-insulin-pump/


This is some very good information and I have heard other people on pumps discuss this.  If you are a pumper or know a Diabetic on a pump you should read this.  The writer, Melissa Lee is a pumper and this information is trustworthy.  I have too experienced "baggage claim" low so this would explain what is happening to people who are sensitive to insulin as I am.  
I’ve been pumping insulin for the last 14 years, and I travel frequently.  In fact, I’m on an airplane every couple of months.  
I always struggle with my blood glucose during air travel, and attribute the in-flight fluctuations to the stress of travel, or the crappy fast food breakfast I probably had prior to boarding (must have miscalculated those carbs), or even to sheer diabetes randomness. It was only recently, however, that I learned something critical about insulin pumps and airplanes, something that I hadn’t ever been told – not by device companies, not by my medical team, not by my online friends.
- See more at: http://asweetlife.org/feature/what-you-should-know-about-flying-with-an-insulin-pump/#sthash.uU976MLj.dpuf
I’ve been pumping insulin for the last 14 years, and I travel frequently.  In fact, I’m on an airplane every couple of months.  
I always struggle with my blood glucose during air travel, and attribute the in-flight fluctuations to the stress of travel, or the crappy fast food breakfast I probably had prior to boarding (must have miscalculated those carbs), or even to sheer diabetes randomness. It was only recently, however, that I learned something critical about insulin pumps and airplanes, something that I hadn’t ever been told – not by device companies, not by my medical team, not by my online friends.
- See more at: http://asweetlife.org/feature/what-you-should-know-about-flying-with-an-insulin-pump/#sthash.uU976MLj.dpuf
I’ve been pumping insulin for the last 14 years, and I travel frequently.  In fact, I’m on an airplane every couple of months.  
I always struggle with my blood glucose during air travel, and attribute the in-flight fluctuations to the stress of travel, or the crappy fast food breakfast I probably had prior to boarding (must have miscalculated those carbs), or even to sheer diabetes randomness. It was only recently, however, that I learned something critical about insulin pumps and airplanes, something that I hadn’t ever been told – not by device companies, not by my medical team, not by my online friends.
- See more at: http://asweetlife.org/feature/what-you-should-know-about-flying-with-an-insulin-pump/#sthash.uU976MLj.dpuf
I’ve been pumping insulin for the last 14 years, and I travel frequently.  In fact, I’m on an airplane every couple of months.  
I always struggle with my blood glucose during air travel, and attribute the in-flight fluctuations to the stress of travel, or the crappy fast food breakfast I probably had prior to boarding (must have miscalculated those carbs), or even to sheer diabetes randomness. It was only recently, however, that I learned something critical about insulin pumps and airplanes, something that I hadn’t ever been told – not by device companies, not by my medical team, not by my online friends.
- See more at: http://asweetlife.org/feature/what-you-should-know-about-flying-with-an-insulin-pump/#sthash.uU976MLj.dpuf
I’ve been pumping insulin for the last 14 years, and I travel frequently.  In fact, I’m on an airplane every couple of months.  
I always struggle with my blood glucose during air travel, and attribute the in-flight fluctuations to the stress of travel, or the crappy fast food breakfast I probably had prior to boarding (must have miscalculated those carbs), or even to sheer diabetes randomness. It was only recently, however, that I learned something critical about insulin pumps and airplanes, something that I hadn’t ever been told – not by device companies, not by my medical team, not by my online friends.
- See more at: http://asweetlife.org/feature/what-you-should-know-about-flying-with-an-insulin-pump/#sthash.uU976MLj.dpuf
I’ve been pumping insulin for the last 14 years, and I travel frequently.  In fact, I’m on an airplane every couple of months.  
I always struggle with my blood glucose during air travel, and attribute the in-flight fluctuations to the stress of travel, or the crappy fast food breakfast I probably had prior to boarding (must have miscalculated those carbs), or even to sheer diabetes randomness. It was only recently, however, that I learned something critical about insulin pumps and airplanes, something that I hadn’t ever been told – not by device companies, not by my medical team, not by my online friends.
- See more at: http://asweetlife.org/feature/what-you-should-know-about-flying-with-an-insulin-pump/#sthash.uU976MLj.dpuf
I’ve been pumping insulin for the last 14 years, and I travel frequently.  In fact, I’m on an airplane every couple of months.  
I always struggle with my blood glucose during air travel, and attribute the in-flight fluctuations to the stress of travel, or the crappy fast food breakfast I probably had prior to boarding (must have miscalculated those carbs), or even to sheer diabetes randomness. It was only recently, however, that I learned something critical about insulin pumps and airplanes, something that I hadn’t ever been told – not by device companies, not by my medical team, not by my online friends.
- See more at: http://asweetlife.org/feature/what-you-should-know-about-flying-with-an-insulin-pump/#sthash.uU976MLj.dpuf

Want to stay updated on my blog posts? Subscribe by Email today!